Why can’t fathers take more time for their family?

Why can’t fathers take more time for their family?

In 1993, the Family Medical Leave Act was passed, primarily to allow mothers to take time off from work to have children without losing their jobs.  But the wording of the act also allowed a rather revolutionary idea: fathers could take time off for the birth of their children as well.  At the time, some fathers were already allowed this opportunity but is wasn’t exactly encouraged.

Since this…

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Why Is Tom Brady Considered Great?

Why Is Tom Brady Considered Great?

To stay relevant in the offseason, nfl.com does a lot of fun things to keep fans checking things out.  Right now they are using the bracket idea of your March Madnessoffice pool to create a tiered survey as to who the fans think the best quarterback of all time is.  This subject creates a lot of argument among fans, some bandwagoning on the newest thing, some taking a more historical perspective.…

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Why are single moms being painted as villains?

Why are single moms being painted as villains?

In 2012, there were 24,725,000 single parent families in the United States.  That accounts for 35% of the families. The vast majority of those families are headed by mom, as nearly one in three children in this country live without a father.  While it is not requisite to have a male figure in children’s lives, statistics bear out that life is more difficult for these kids.

Boys without fathers…

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My Long Relationship With Cancer

My Long Relationship With Cancer

Cancer is probably the worst thing a person can experience.  Most people are lucky enough not to know someone with cancer.  I, unfortunately, am not one of them.

I was ten years old when my cousin, Michael, died of cancer, specifically a mass in his brain.  He went from being a very active teen to being bed ridden in just a few months.  After several painful and body wasting treatments, he…

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What Difference Can One Child Make?When I was eight years old, my world revolved around kickball and Star Wars™ figures.  I don’t…View Post

What Difference Can One Child Make?

When I was eight years old, my world revolved around kickball and Star Wars™ figures.  I don’t…

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Regarding Richard Sherman

http://www.whatshanesaid.com/?p=275

Zora Neale Hurston: A Rediscovered Treasure

In my first year of college, a lot of books floated in and out of my awareness. I tried to muddle through all the junk I was supposed to absorb and spew back, then forget about at the end of the semester.  One book really stuck with me, so much so that I…

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The Poor Are Still Poor After The HolidaysDuring the winter holidays, many people get caught up in the spirit of the season and want to help…View Post

The Poor Are Still Poor After The Holidays

During the winter holidays, many people get caught up in the spirit of the season and want to help…

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cjchivers:

Tribute to a Slain Cameraman.
Al Jazeera’s Jane Arraf on the passing of her friend, Yasser Faisal,  who was killed last week by masked gunmebn in Syria’s Idlib Governorate. An Iraqi with deep experience, he had gone to Syria to cover foreign jihadists, and was hosted in Ildib by one Jabhat al Nusra’s fighting groups, according to a friend who traveled with him inside.
Ms. Arraf wrote:

He’d left Baghdad at the end of November on a flight to Turkey with a new camera, new clothes and boundless confidence. If he’d told his family or friends he was crossing over into Syria they would have tried to stop him.
Once across the Turkish border, a Syrian journalist took him into Idlib province and warned him not to go any further.
"I told him this is not like Iraq – this is a whole other story," says Muhanad Dhugeim who took the photos of Yasser before they parted ways. "He said he could handle it."

She added:

"At their home in Fallujah on Monday, Yasser’s family was still trying to understand why he died. His eldest daughter, Sara, is ten. His youngest children, just four and two, will know him only through stories about him and the legacy of his stories that showed Iraq to the world. 
"I’m glad he died a hero," said Afrah, one of his four sisters.
Yasser was buried in Fallujah, the city he loved, next to Shiekh Khalid al-Jumaily, a leader of the protest movement who was assassinated in Fallujah two weeks ago. A sign at the cemetery reads that 1,200 bodies from the battles of Fallujah in 2004, still unidentified, are buried there.  Yasser survived those battles and all the ones that followed. They believe in fate here. Yasser travelled to meet his in a battle still unfolding.

Many questions surround his killing, which happened after four gunmen stopped the car he was riding in and, in what appears to have been a targeted killing, shot him repeatedly at close range. Who killed him? Why? On whose orders? How did they know precisely where he would be? Why did they kill him and let others in the car live?
Violence against journalists in Syria is worse than in any other recent conflict, according to CPJ.  Many foreign and Syrian journalists have been abducted. A few have been missing more than a year. Others have died on the battlefield, sometimes in suspicious circumstances.
There is no end in sight.
Read the full tribute here, where the photograph, at top, appeared.

cjchivers:

Tribute to a Slain Cameraman.

Al Jazeera’s Jane Arraf on the passing of her friend, Yasser Faisal,  who was killed last week by masked gunmebn in Syria’s Idlib Governorate. An Iraqi with deep experience, he had gone to Syria to cover foreign jihadists, and was hosted in Ildib by one Jabhat al Nusra’s fighting groups, according to a friend who traveled with him inside.

Ms. Arraf wrote:

He’d left Baghdad at the end of November on a flight to Turkey with a new camera, new clothes and boundless confidence. If he’d told his family or friends he was crossing over into Syria they would have tried to stop him.

Once across the Turkish border, a Syrian journalist took him into Idlib province and warned him not to go any further.

"I told him this is not like Iraq – this is a whole other story," says Muhanad Dhugeim who took the photos of Yasser before they parted ways. "He said he could handle it."

She added:

"At their home in Fallujah on Monday, Yasser’s family was still trying to understand why he died. His eldest daughter, Sara, is ten. His youngest children, just four and two, will know him only through stories about him and the legacy of his stories that showed Iraq to the world. 

"I’m glad he died a hero," said Afrah, one of his four sisters.

Yasser was buried in Fallujah, the city he loved, next to Shiekh Khalid al-Jumaily, a leader of the protest movement who was assassinated in Fallujah two weeks ago. A sign at the cemetery reads that 1,200 bodies from the battles of Fallujah in 2004, still unidentified, are buried there.  Yasser survived those battles and all the ones that followed. They believe in fate here. Yasser travelled to meet his in a battle still unfolding.

Many questions surround his killing, which happened after four gunmen stopped the car he was riding in and, in what appears to have been a targeted killing, shot him repeatedly at close range. Who killed him? Why? On whose orders? How did they know precisely where he would be? Why did they kill him and let others in the car live?

Violence against journalists in Syria is worse than in any other recent conflict, according to CPJ.  Many foreign and Syrian journalists have been abducted. A few have been missing more than a year. Others have died on the battlefield, sometimes in suspicious circumstances.

There is no end in sight.

Read the full tribute here, where the photograph, at top, appeared.